26 Followers
17 Following
awkwordly

all hearthfires & holocausts

eating books. bleeding words.

Currently reading

Wonder
R.J. Palacio
The Chaos of Stars
Kiersten White
One
LeighAnn Kopans
Cherry Money Baby
John M. Cusick
The Dream Thieves
Maggie Stiefvater
Undying (Undying, #1)
Cyndy Aleo
Revolution - Jennifer Donnelly I was a little wary going into this book, simply because I'm not much of a history girl. I correlate history lessons with boring lectures full of dry facts and more dates than my feeble brain can possibly hope to remember. I always thought it was a shame that history sucked the passion out of life. However, Revolution--much like Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series--does an incredible job of weaving together a history lesson within an engaging plot line. Set in modern day France, Andi discovers a young girl's firsthand account of eighteenth century France and the brewing revolution and the tragic life of Louis-Charles, King Louis' young son and heir. At times I had trouble sympathizing with both Andi and Alex. I don't know if I ever truly liked either of them, but still... I sympathized with their stories. I think that's also a point in Donnelly's favor; rarely am I able to enjoy a story told by a character I can't fully respect. The way in which it was told was brilliant--it's merely a cross-section of the event, and yet I felt I had the scope of the revolution by the end of it. The perspective on the revolution was also unique, I think. Most things I've read are told from the revolutionaries perspective, idealizing and justifying the brutality of the coup. In Revolution, we get both points of view--from Andi's beginnings as a poor Parisian, to her eventual affection and understanding for the royal family, and her grief when they are overtaken. A very well-rounded story; smart and beautifully written.